Trip to DC: Candidacy Business, Part 1

Photo finish arrival to a wedding; church at St. Paul’s; and initial interview

This weekend was truly a whirlwind of activity; this blog post is assuredly going to mirror that pattern and pace.  To start, I departed New Haven with the assistance of my wonderful housemate Ryan, who was nice enough to drive me over to the train station.  After getting a LOT of reading done for Pastoral Care & Addiction, as well as delightful AMTRAK-style nap, we pulled into DC slightly ahead of schedule.  This was key for the next step; two individuals from the mission trip to Zambia I helped plan and lead, Gail and Karen, were getting married at my church in DC, St. Paul’s, and although the wedding started before I arrived on the train (4:30pm), the reception was set to end an hour after my arrival (6:30pm).  With this goal in mind, I moved like some kind of lightning/wind amalgamation, running to the Metro like Tom Hanks in The Terminal due to being laden with my possessions.  Therein, I was blessed with a quickly-arriving train, and only slight delays.  All told, I was somewhat unpresentable (sweating due to carrying my stuff from the Metro to church, and wearing the shorts/t-shirt I had on for the train ride), but the bride and groom weren’t expecting me to be able to make it, so it was a great surprise.

After the wedding, I made my way south towards Franconia/Springfield, the southmost Metro stop on the Blue Line.  My friends Erika and David Stoner, were wonderfully gracious and offered me a space to stay while I was in town on Saturday night.  I arrived after a lengthy trip (the Metro was CRAZY due to fear-mongering “security” measures which had people’s bags getting checked during the busiest time of the night), and we watched part of Young Frankenstein before heading to sleep.  In the morning, we departed en masse to church at St. Paul’s.

While at St. Paul’s, I would like to take a moment and speak to the high quality of the service for the combination of Rally Day and the commemoration of 9/11.  The first reading was Genesis 50:15-21, the second reading was Romans 14:1-12, and the Gospel reading was Matthew 18:21-35.  This was all towards the end of commemorating 9/11 with the underlying theme of forgiveness, and Pastor Tom accomplished this with a masterful sermon; it was amongst the best I have ever heard him preach.  Similarly, the focus of the liturgy was on this concept of really wrestling with how radical this notion of forgiveness, as presented by Jesus, really is; I think a lot of people in the congregation benefited from the experience.  Finally, it was genuinely a pleasure to be back in church there, and many families and individuals I know well were delighted to see me, and made me feel quite loved!

After church, I had Part 1 of my Lutheran candidacy process, an initial interview that seemed to go quite well. More on this as I hear back from them!  I also had the brief chance to visit with some old friends, which was grand.

The Friendly Cabbie

On the way to AMTRAK for my trip out of DC, I had a fantastically nice and engaging cabbie to chat with.  Its an old habit of mine, drawn from my time in Israel/Palestine, to get to know cabbies as much as possible; it is also a tendency that has paid off in getting to know cities better.  This gentleman, I learned after our ~20 minute conversation, was an older black man who was an atheist and a conscripted veteran of Vietnam (and this religious outlook was related to his experiences there).  In short, we discussed everything from the nature of the “security” response to terrorism by the government, to the issue of ethical international development, to my personal sense of vocational calling and how it rests upon the border of the secular and the sacred.  At the end of the conversation, I was immensely complimented; he said that I am one of the first religious leaders (albeit in-training) he has ever been able to respect, after conversation.  I mention this for the sole reason of establishing a comparison for the next event in my evening…

The Obtuse Cabbie

…which happened after my brief AMTRAK trip from DC to BWI, which was peaceful, timely, and enjoyable (it IS AMTRAK, after all). Got off of the train, walked up to the first cab in line, and the cabbie comes over. He is wearing a kilt 3 sizes too big.

::imagine an internal Civil Defense Force siren here::

For better or worse, my cab fate was sealed. He had a “COEXIST” sticker on the back window, which I thought meant we could have a talk about religion, and my clergy intentions.

Boy, was I wrong.

To make a long story short, he was interested and let me explain part of The Plan (in terms of what I am studying and the like). Then, he interjected and mentioned he is a member of the Universal Life Church (the folks who will send you official paperwork claiming you are an ordained clergy member in whatever religion, scam-style). Then, he mentioned he is a nudist (and gave this as an explanation for the kilt. Lovely.). Then, he explained that he is Wiccan, and started calling me out on problems caused by Christians. Highlights included him accusing all Christians of certain traits and outlooks (hating the environment, the poor, and more!), and was rounded out by his seemingly entirely-genuine dissolution at “Christians who rudely  generalize about us non-Christians.”  This continued for 10 minutes in the parking lot of my hotel here, until he got a phone call and I was able to escape the unorganized verbal assault that was in progress. I left him a $4 tip, to avoid having to touch change from his hands.  Never a dull moment. Never.

The Motivated Cabbie

As a quick side note, my hotel stay was mostly pleasant.  The staff was nice, and my room was in mostly nice condition. The only exception: the air conditioner was installed wrong, so that when the fan in it spooled up, but particularly when it spooled down after cooling the room, would shake that wall of the room.  The first time it happened, I nearly crapped in my pants, as it sounded as though someone was trying to bust down the door with a crowbar.  This happened every ~15 minutes or so, so needless to say I slept lightly on Sunday evening.  On Monday morning, the cabbie I called was there early at the hotel, which was a good sign.  He was airing a VERY Pentecostal radio station, and so we chatted about non-religious things (as I have been roped into zealous arguments with Pentecostal cabbies before) on the way to the place (more on the event, the ELCA psychological evaluation, below).  I liked the guy and gave him a big tip, so that he would be willing to drive all the way over to get me whenever I was finished.  The trip away from the office, back to the BWI AMTRAK station, though, was fantastic.  At that point, I mentioned why I was in DC, what I was studying, and what I hoped to do.  This fascinated him, and he started bubbling over with stories of his own along the same lines.  While driving on the highway with one hand (I was bracing for impact), he reached down to the front passenger seat floor and grabbed a copy of his business plan for a development company in his native Ghana (photo of this below); in short, he is working to get money invested to help him set up a localized home construction company, designed to teach useful skills to people while also giving them and their neighbors safer, better quality housing.  He also mentioned that he was an ordained Pentecostal preacher for 20 or so years in Ghana, and set up 5 churches before coming to the US; all in all, he was an amazing man with a great story; and yet more evidence as to my strong insistence on getting to know cabbies any- and every-where!

The Ecumenical Cabbie

The final taxi of my whirlwind of a weekend was from the New Haven AMTRAK to my home; the gentleman was a Muslim who was very interested in why I looked so tired and yet so well-dressed coming off the train (at least I did one thing right this weekend!).  I explained the story of what I am studying and how that landed me in DC for the weekend; we proceeded to have a fantastic and open discussion about how each of our respective faiths have done better or worse at things like flexibility to exist within a changing world, versus the issue of not losing sight of the purpose of the faith.  We parted quite amicably, and he thanked me for an excellent conversation that got him thinking about his faith; I thanked him for the same.  I have his business card, and will likely garner additional installments to this dialogue over future trips to the train station.

Psychological evaluation; return to AMTRAK

There was a large serving of multiple choice questions for me to fill out the bubbles (approximately 900 of them!) for during my visit to the office.  To establish the proper mood of what I am referring to, please watch this informational video on the subject of questionnaire length.  That said, a small sample of what tests I went through included a lengthy career interest survey; the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI-2); the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (WAIS-R); and then several puzzle, math, and spatial reasoning-based miniature tests.  I know two things about the experience: I finished an hour early (an old, bad habit from first grade; finish fast without checking my work), and I will eventually receive a full copy of the report that this event will generate.  I, like many who are following this candidacy process I am in the midst of, find myself quite interested to see just what this report ends up saying; more on this as I get a copy!

Photographs: Yale paraphernalia,time in DC, etc

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